Tag Archives: Teaching English in Korea

Anatomy of a Teacher Dinner

The teacher dinner. If you teach English at a public school in Korea, there’s no avoiding it. Truthfully, I dread these dinners. I never know if they’re going to go for one hour or three. Most of the time I don’t even know that they’re happening until the morning of the event. Dinners are solitary […]

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WinterCamp

Five Compelling Reasons to Teach English in Korea

I could (and do) prattle on about experiencing Korean culture, loving my students, or the low cost of rural life. I could tell you that the pay in Korea is among the highest for foreign English teachers, and that you get cash bonuses for flights, re-signing, and completing your contract. I could even talk about […]

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Accidental Mad Libs

The kids aren’t the only ones who are getting lazy towards the end of the school year. I am, too. For example, I taught my free talking class how to play ‘Yahtzee’ on Thursday. My concession to education was that they had to say the numbers in English. They didn’t do this, of course, but […]

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Shoes Off in Korea

Getting Used to Korea

It’s been nearly 13 months since we arrived in Korea. I can use chopsticks like a pro (or at least a semi-pro) and kimchi is just another side dish. It’s funny the things you get used to without noticing it.   Bowing Traditionally, Koreans don’t wave. They bow. This was not comfortable for me. To […]

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English No

English No

I was riding to school (that’s right, on my pink bicycle with a basket) this morning when I heard a frenzy of pedaling and heavy breathing behind me. “Hello Lo-ren!” It was Tae-Hun, a second grader who lives in our building. He sped past me on his tinker toy bicycle, waving over his shoulder. “Goodbye […]

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How to Operate the Aircon – Korean Style

Just as there is with everything in Korea, there is an unspoken set of obscure rules for operating the air conditioner. Here’s how it’s done. Step 1: Call it an ayuhcon. All one word. Don’t pronounce the ‘r’ or people won’t know what you’re talking about. Step 2: Wait for a really, really hot day. […]

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